stdClass Object
(
    [ID] => 20457
    [post_author] => 23
    [post_date] => 2019-10-10 13:07:51
    [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-10 13:07:51
    [post_content] => after Keith Douglas

The landers spat us to the sand like seeds,
and the Germans – secure in concrete barrows –
watched an army grow towards them.
When shells hit, I saw limbs attached to nothing
but the memory of movement.
We walked on whatever was underfoot.

Soon we were flame through red phosphorus,
consuming the cliffs and their emplacements.
We had a task, and the tools to do it.

Look - men at prayer, a chaplain at his altar –
the bonnet of a Jeep, tarp its corporal cloth.
Mass over, he makes his way to the many dead,
gives them his blessing: ashes to ashes, etc.

Cordite hanging thick as incense, we march on Bayeux.
War waits for us with a piece of shrapnel for every man.
    [post_title] => Gold Beach
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => gold-beach
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2021-04-07 08:56:56
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-04-07 08:56:56
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://poems.poetrysociety.org.uk/?post_type=poems&p=20457
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => poems
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [meta_data] => stdClass Object
        (
            [wpcf-published-in] => 
            [wpcf-date-published] => 
            [wpcf-summary-description] => This poem is commended in the Timothy Corsellis Prize 2019 on Young Poets Network (YPN), judged by Fran Brearton, MRIA, Professor of Modern Poetry at Queen’s University Belfast, and a recognised authority on 20th century war poetry; Karen Leeder, FRSA, poet and professor of Modern German Literature at New College, Oxford; Susie Thornberry, Assistant Director of the Imperial War Museum in London; and Judith Palmer, Director of The Poetry Society. The Timothy Corsellis Prize is an annual poetry prize calling for poems in response to a selection of poets of the Second World War, including Keith Douglas, Sidney Keyes, Alun Lewis, John Jarmain, Henry Reed, Anna Akhmatova, Gertrud Kolmar, Günter Eich, Miklós Radnóti and Timothy Corsellis.

Jack Cooper, the poet, said of writing this poem, "While researching the work of Keith Douglas, I found myself inspired by his “extrospective” poetic style – his more observational, detached voice – and how openly he discussed death, including his own death in “On a Return from Egypt” and “Simplify Me When I’m Dead”. Douglas fought in the Normandy invasion, landing on Gold Beach with the Sherwood Rangers. In “Gold Beach”, I wanted to channel Douglas’ writing style and his personal involvement in D-Day. The 10th line has a nod to “Vergissmeinnicht”, and the closing couplet is a premonition of Douglas’ death by enemy mortar fire on June 9th 1944, near Bayeux."
            [wpcf-rights-information] => 
            [wpcf-poem-award] => Commended, Timothy Corsellis Prize 2019
            [wpcf_pr_belongs] => 
        )

    [poet_data] => stdClass Object
        (
            [ID] => 19742
            [forename] => 
            [surname] => 
            [title] => Jack Cooper
            [slug] => jack-cooper
            [content] => Jack is the first-prize winner of the second Bloodaxe Archive challenge on Young Poets Network, about White Space. He is the second-prize winner of the Ode to (Small) Joy challenge, and the third-prize winner of the Carol Ann Duffy challenge and the nonsense poetry challenge.

Jack is commended in Gboyega Odubanjo's People Need Nature challenge, the Climate Crisis and You challenge, the Bletchley Park challenge, the moon poetry challenge, the Mary Wollstonecraft challenge, the Timothy Corsellis Prize 2019 and August challenge #3 on meta-poetry.
        )

)
stdClass Object
(
    [ID] => 19742
    [forename] => 
    [surname] => 
    [title] => Jack Cooper
    [slug] => jack-cooper
    [content] => Jack is the first-prize winner of the second Bloodaxe Archive challenge on Young Poets Network, about White Space. He is the second-prize winner of the Ode to (Small) Joy challenge, and the third-prize winner of the Carol Ann Duffy challenge and the nonsense poetry challenge.

Jack is commended in Gboyega Odubanjo's People Need Nature challenge, the Climate Crisis and You challenge, the Bletchley Park challenge, the moon poetry challenge, the Mary Wollstonecraft challenge, the Timothy Corsellis Prize 2019 and August challenge #3 on meta-poetry.
)

Gold Beach

Jack Cooper

after Keith Douglas

The landers spat us to the sand like seeds,
and the Germans – secure in concrete barrows –
watched an army grow towards them.
When shells hit, I saw limbs attached to nothing
but the memory of movement.
We walked on whatever was underfoot.

Soon we were flame through red phosphorus,
consuming the cliffs and their emplacements.
We had a task, and the tools to do it.

Look – men at prayer, a chaplain at his altar –
the bonnet of a Jeep, tarp its corporal cloth.
Mass over, he makes his way to the many dead,
gives them his blessing: ashes to ashes, etc.

Cordite hanging thick as incense, we march on Bayeux.
War waits for us with a piece of shrapnel for every man.