stdClass Object
(
    [ID] => 16252
    [post_author] => 16
    [post_date] => 2015-10-10 17:07:02
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-10-10 17:07:02
    [post_content] => Hovering ghosts in Himalayan foothills
skin beautifully cool, eyes
hollow as spent cartridges
we exhale smoke from Victorys
by the side of a road that passes
the convalescence hospital.
Rough cut layers of mountain above
march in sturdy sequence to
a towering crescendo of white summits.
Geology softens in morning light
transforms to crumpled piles of jumble
waiting to be rifled through.
Beneath, a lone Sherpa
starts his slow ascent, bent back
burdened with a baby grand piano
stiff legs skyward as a big game trophy.
We watch the weighted figure
with amazement for the Sherpa
is a mere eighth-rest of a man.
“Look at that lazy bugger”
quips Dusty and quick laughter
landslides in a throaty scree.
    [post_title] => Sunrise
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => sunrise
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2018-01-03 17:13:25
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-03 17:13:25
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://poetrysociety.org.uk/?post_type=poems&p=16252
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => poems
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [meta_data] => stdClass Object
        (
            [wpcf-published-in] => 
            [wpcf-date-published] => 2015
            [wpcf-summary-description] => This poem was a winner in the Timothy Corsellis Prize on Young Poets Network (YPN) in 2015.

This poem is the 1st prize winner in the Timothy Corsellis Prize 2015  on Young Poets Network (YPN), judged by Rowan Williams, Fran Brearton, Nic Vanderpeet and Judith Palmer.

Jenny says of her poem: Inspired by the Alun Lewis poem “All Day It Has Rained”, I tried to create a strong sense of atmosphere with “Sunrise”, in a place where elements and geology dominate. The poem is based on a strange scene my Uncle Ernie described to me. Like Lewis, my Uncle fought in Burma in WWII. He was a radio operator in the Black Cat (17th Indian) Division and spent a brief time in a Himalayan convalescence hospital.
Lewis personifies the rain as the “skirmishing” enemy in his poem, whereas I chose to use the elements in a positive, transformative way: the sunlight turns the harsh geography into cloth-like piles, reminiscent of a jumble sale back at home. I wasn’t sure about the word-play of “rifled through” but I think my Uncle (and perhaps Lewis) might have liked it.
In Lewis’s poem there is the juxtaposition of mundane details such as “darning dirty socks” with dramatic images such as ”dropping bombs on Rome” and “herded refugees”. I tried to create juxtapositional images too: a raw, rugged environment vs the strange, unexpected appearance of a refined instrument – the baby grand piano – on a man’s back!
I like the way Lewis adds increasing intimacy and detail with proper nouns such as “Sheet and Steep” and the “Shoulder o’ Mutton”, so I mentioned Dusty by name in the story.
Death triumphs in “All Day It Has Rained”, as it literally and bluntly ends the poem. I tried to convey a more hopeful conclusion to “Sunrise”, showing that the soldiers’ sense of humour had not been broken by the horrors of war. However, death still triumphs in the end – my Uncle Ernie and Dusty now exist only in the memories of those who knew and loved them. They are hovering ghosts in the Himalayan foothills.
            [wpcf-rights-information] => 
            [wpcf-poem-award] => Winner, Timothy Corsellis Prize 2015
            [wpcf_pr_belongs] => 
        )

    [poet_data] => stdClass Object
        (
            [ID] => 348
            [forename] => 
            [surname] => 
            [title] => Jennifer Burville-Riley
            [slug] => jennifer-burville-riley
            [content] => Jennifer is a winner of the Foyle Young Poets of the Year Award 2013, and commended in 2014, 2015 and 2017. She was a SLAMbassadors winner in 2013. Jennifer is a commended poet in the Timothy Corsellis Prize 2016 on Young Poets Network. She is also the first prize winner of the Timothy Corsellis Prize 2015, and a winner of the Young Poets Network 'Performance poem' challenge.
        )

)
stdClass Object
(
    [ID] => 348
    [forename] => 
    [surname] => 
    [title] => Jennifer Burville-Riley
    [slug] => jennifer-burville-riley
    [content] => Jennifer is a winner of the Foyle Young Poets of the Year Award 2013, and commended in 2014, 2015 and 2017. She was a SLAMbassadors winner in 2013. Jennifer is a commended poet in the Timothy Corsellis Prize 2016 on Young Poets Network. She is also the first prize winner of the Timothy Corsellis Prize 2015, and a winner of the Young Poets Network 'Performance poem' challenge.
)

Sunrise

Jennifer Burville-Riley

Hovering ghosts in Himalayan foothills
skin beautifully cool, eyes
hollow as spent cartridges
we exhale smoke from Victorys
by the side of a road that passes
the convalescence hospital.
Rough cut layers of mountain above
march in sturdy sequence to
a towering crescendo of white summits.
Geology softens in morning light
transforms to crumpled piles of jumble
waiting to be rifled through.
Beneath, a lone Sherpa
starts his slow ascent, bent back
burdened with a baby grand piano
stiff legs skyward as a big game trophy.
We watch the weighted figure
with amazement for the Sherpa
is a mere eighth-rest of a man.
“Look at that lazy bugger”
quips Dusty and quick laughter
landslides in a throaty scree.