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    [ID] => 19963
    [post_author] => 23
    [post_date] => 2019-04-26 11:34:45
    [post_date_gmt] => 2019-04-26 11:34:45
    [post_content] => We blame our bad days
on opening umbrellas indoors,
magpies and broken mirrors,
walking past black cats
on pavement cracks
under ladders,
killing spiders,
spilling salt on the table
next to new shoes in a size 13.
Cold calls from numbers ending in
666 -

throwing pennies,
picking clovers,
blowing candles out,
wishing for something better
than this.

Would you dare
to cross me on the stairs
now the wick has burnt out,
the clovers are dead
and the well is long dried up?
    [post_title] => One for Sorrow
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => one-for-sorrow
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2019-04-30 14:10:06
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-30 14:10:06
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://poems.poetrysociety.org.uk/?post_type=poems&p=19963
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => poems
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
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        (
            [wpcf-published-in] => 
            [wpcf-date-published] => 2019
            [wpcf-summary-description] => This poem is the second-prize winner in the Carol Ann Duffy challenge on Young Poets Network (YPN).

The challenge was co-written and judged by Duffy expert Dr Mari Hughes-Edwards, who said that this poem is "the perfect recreation and re-envisioning of Duffy's first four collections encapsulated in one poem. Many writers focus on 'The World's Wife', but here we have a poet who understands the value of the collection 'Mean Time' and the other three Anvil collections - and who 'gets' the fundamental suffering-based framework of Duffy's writing; who understands the creative value that damage/danger and day to day darkness brings to Duffy's work. There are flashes of dark humour here - again reflective of Duffy's early work - and a sense of the same daredevil delight in the macabre - e.g. in the 'new shoes in a size 13'.  The importance of the phone to Duffy's work - in creating and sustaining comfort in the face of this but also in bringing bad news- is well understood here.  The 'in your face' question at the close of the poem is truly beautiful - the kind of challenge Duffy's early work - and also her later collections like 'Rapture' make of the reader. Very well done."
            [wpcf-rights-information] => 
            [wpcf-poem-award] => 2nd prize, Carol Ann Duffy challenge
            [wpcf_pr_belongs] => 
        )

    [poet_data] => stdClass Object
        (
            [ID] => 19984
            [forename] => 
            [surname] => 
            [title] => Lauren Aspery
            [slug] => lauren-aspery
            [content] => Lauren is the second-prize winner of the Carol Ann Duffy challenge on Young Poets Network, judged by Mari Hughes-Edwards, and celebrating Duffy's legacy as Poet Laureate.
        )

)
stdClass Object
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    [ID] => 19984
    [forename] => 
    [surname] => 
    [title] => Lauren Aspery
    [slug] => lauren-aspery
    [content] => Lauren is the second-prize winner of the Carol Ann Duffy challenge on Young Poets Network, judged by Mari Hughes-Edwards, and celebrating Duffy's legacy as Poet Laureate.
)

One for Sorrow

Lauren Aspery

We blame our bad days
on opening umbrellas indoors,
magpies and broken mirrors,
walking past black cats
on pavement cracks
under ladders,
killing spiders,
spilling salt on the table
next to new shoes in a size 13.
Cold calls from numbers ending in
666 –

throwing pennies,
picking clovers,
blowing candles out,
wishing for something better
than this.

Would you dare
to cross me on the stairs
now the wick has burnt out,
the clovers are dead
and the well is long dried up?