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    [ID] => 19569
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    [post_date] => 2018-10-18 11:43:40
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    [post_content] => At last / she turned around / into the Arrivals gate / at Terminal 5 / and I counted the seconds it took / for her eyes to find us / the time / I took to recognise her myself / browned / new smells hugging to flesh. / Only a week / but she laughed / at how tall we’d gotten, / commanded my sister & I / back to back. / I was still taller / she said / but whispered that / it wasn’t by much. / Spoke in a voice / I could make full rooms from / gentle, / held our cheeks / by tired hands. / As if by some need / to touch what was her own, / smiling, / like it was something / she was surprised at herself for. / I stared back / wondered what my mother saw / in each stretched absence. / If that night / she would dream of children / with swollen stomachs / and empty hands, / if she would always measure / what had been lost / by the difference / in her daughters’ spines. / Eventually, / with fingers gripped tight between us / we drove through the evening, / & I thought about / what had been broken / in my mother, / how fast / I could make it whole
    [post_title] => My Mother's Return
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    [post_name] => my-mothers-return
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    [post_modified] => 2018-10-18 11:43:40
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    [guid] => http://poems.poetrysociety.org.uk/?post_type=poems&p=19569
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            [wpcf-published-in] => 
            [wpcf-date-published] => 2018
            [wpcf-summary-description] => This poem is the second-prize winner in the 2018 August Challenge #1 on Young Poets Network (YPN).
            [wpcf-rights-information] => 
            [wpcf-poem-award] => 2nd Prize 2018 August Challenge #1
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            [ID] => 16366
            [forename] => 
            [surname] => 
            [title] => Lucy Thynne
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            [content] => Lucy Thynne is a top 15 winner of the Foyle Young Poets of the Year Award 2016, 2017 and 2018. She is also second-prize winner in the 2018 August challenge #1 on prose poetry on Young Poets Network and a winner in the 2016 Behind the Curtain poetry challenge on Young Poets Network, in partnership with the V&A Museum. She is a winner in the 2015 Young Poets Network Christina Broom and the Suffragettes writing challenge, was commended in the Timothy Corsellis Prize 2015 and the Young Poets Network Festive Feasts, Eve of St Agnes Challenge, and won the BBC Proms Poetry Competition junior category in 2016.
        )

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    [ID] => 16366
    [forename] => 
    [surname] => 
    [title] => Lucy Thynne
    [slug] => lucy-thynne
    [content] => Lucy Thynne is a top 15 winner of the Foyle Young Poets of the Year Award 2016, 2017 and 2018. She is also second-prize winner in the 2018 August challenge #1 on prose poetry on Young Poets Network and a winner in the 2016 Behind the Curtain poetry challenge on Young Poets Network, in partnership with the V&A Museum. She is a winner in the 2015 Young Poets Network Christina Broom and the Suffragettes writing challenge, was commended in the Timothy Corsellis Prize 2015 and the Young Poets Network Festive Feasts, Eve of St Agnes Challenge, and won the BBC Proms Poetry Competition junior category in 2016.
)

My Mother’s Return

Lucy Thynne

At last / she turned around / into the Arrivals gate / at Terminal 5 / and I counted the seconds it took / for her eyes to find us / the time / I took to recognise her myself / browned / new smells hugging to flesh. / Only a week / but she laughed / at how tall we’d gotten, / commanded my sister & I / back to back. / I was still taller / she said / but whispered that / it wasn’t by much. / Spoke in a voice / I could make full rooms from / gentle, / held our cheeks / by tired hands. / As if by some need / to touch what was her own, / smiling, / like it was something / she was surprised at herself for. / I stared back / wondered what my mother saw / in each stretched absence. / If that night / she would dream of children / with swollen stomachs / and empty hands, / if she would always measure / what had been lost / by the difference / in her daughters’ spines. / Eventually, / with fingers gripped tight between us / we drove through the evening, / & I thought about / what had been broken / in my mother, / how fast / I could make it whole