stdClass Object
(
    [ID] => 19491
    [post_author] => 11
    [post_date] => 2018-10-03 14:28:46
    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-10-03 14:28:46
    [post_content] => Fetch a saucepan – the small even-handed one with a lip
on either side,

find the flat wooden stirrer, or better still, use the spurtle
Granddad made,

take the rolled oats from the cupboard – the nearest
stout paper packet –

marvel at the pale yellow elephant on the front, outlined
in bright blue,

look for a cup to match the everyday bowls – Willow Pattern,
Woolworth's best,

fill to the brim with whisper of harvest sprung from earth,
rain and sunlight,

pour into the pan, listen as the soft scurried patter settles
to speckled hush,

add water, use a double measure – plus a dash more – watch
clarity turn to cloud,

place on the burner, stir, feel like the silken swirl begin to chafe
at bubble-burst,

turn the flame right down, cook until resist-of-thicken clings –
this is porridge –

pour into your bowl, mine, deep trails undo, moraines merge
flat and firm,

sprinkle a little brown sugar on top, add just a splash of milk,
a sea of white

floods an island that floats – now, here’s a spoon, sit and eat,
begin at the shore.
    [post_title] => Landfall at daybreak
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => landfall-at-daybreak
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2018-10-04 09:54:05
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-10-04 09:54:05
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://poems.poetrysociety.org.uk/?post_type=poems&p=19491
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => poems
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [meta_data] => stdClass Object
        (
            [wpcf-published-in] => 
            [wpcf-date-published] => 2018
            [wpcf-summary-description] => Joint runner-up in Stanza Poetry Competition 2018, on the theme of 'Tradition', judged by Penelope Shuttle. 

Penelope: The poem proceeds by a very closely observed ritualized description of the porridge-making. A well-chosen form (one long line and one short line in each couplet, giving a lovely measured pace to the poem) brings a sense of  continuity; we realise that we are visiting the past (‘marvel at the pale yellow elephant on the front….’ of the porridge box. The title is witty and apposite, and the spatial detail and tactile process of the poem are a marvel. This is a celebratory poem, mouth-watering, full of relish, a praise poem.  

Helen: There is something meditative about cooking porridge, something comforting about the small details involved in finding the saucepan, measuring out the oats, adding just the right amount of water, stirring the mixture and watching the transformation take place. Early drafts of the poem began with the immediate present-day process and gradually elements of the past such as the Woolworth's Willow Pattern, the spurtle and memories from school geography lessons insisted on being present. As the poem took shape, the sense of having made landfall began to unfold.
            [wpcf-rights-information] => 
            [wpcf-poem-award] => Joint runner-up, Stanza Poetry Competition 2018
            [wpcf_pr_belongs] => 
        )

    [poet_data] => stdClass Object
        (
            [ID] => 7173
            [forename] => 
            [surname] => 
            [title] => Helen Overell
            [slug] => helen-overell
            [content] => Helen Overell lived in many places as a child, including Wales and the north of England, and now lives in the Mole Valley with her husband. She studied at Bristol University and has a BSc Honours Degree in Physics. She has worked as a teacher, a research assistant, in local government and as a science technician. She has always enjoyed writing and takes part in courses and seminar groups at the Poetry School as well as taking an active role in the Mole Valley Poets. Her work is published in magazines including Scintilla, Other Poetry, The Interpreter's House and in Poetry News as well as in anthologies including The Poet's Quest for God: 21st Century Poems of Faith, Doubt and Wonder published in 2016. Her poems are often short-listed or commended in competitions. Her first collection Inscapes & Horizons was published by St Albert's Press in 2008 and her second collection Thumbprints was published by Oversteps Books in 2015. Her website is overell.co.uk/inscapes
        )

)
stdClass Object
(
    [ID] => 7173
    [forename] => 
    [surname] => 
    [title] => Helen Overell
    [slug] => helen-overell
    [content] => Helen Overell lived in many places as a child, including Wales and the north of England, and now lives in the Mole Valley with her husband. She studied at Bristol University and has a BSc Honours Degree in Physics. She has worked as a teacher, a research assistant, in local government and as a science technician. She has always enjoyed writing and takes part in courses and seminar groups at the Poetry School as well as taking an active role in the Mole Valley Poets. Her work is published in magazines including Scintilla, Other Poetry, The Interpreter's House and in Poetry News as well as in anthologies including The Poet's Quest for God: 21st Century Poems of Faith, Doubt and Wonder published in 2016. Her poems are often short-listed or commended in competitions. Her first collection Inscapes & Horizons was published by St Albert's Press in 2008 and her second collection Thumbprints was published by Oversteps Books in 2015. Her website is overell.co.uk/inscapes
)

Landfall at daybreak

Helen Overell

Fetch a saucepan – the small even-handed one with a lip
on either side,

find the flat wooden stirrer, or better still, use the spurtle
Granddad made,

take the rolled oats from the cupboard – the nearest
stout paper packet –

marvel at the pale yellow elephant on the front, outlined
in bright blue,

look for a cup to match the everyday bowls – Willow Pattern,
Woolworth’s best,

fill to the brim with whisper of harvest sprung from earth,
rain and sunlight,

pour into the pan, listen as the soft scurried patter settles
to speckled hush,

add water, use a double measure – plus a dash more – watch
clarity turn to cloud,

place on the burner, stir, feel like the silken swirl begin to chafe
at bubble-burst,

turn the flame right down, cook until resist-of-thicken clings –
this is porridge –

pour into your bowl, mine, deep trails undo, moraines merge
flat and firm,

sprinkle a little brown sugar on top, add just a splash of milk,
a sea of white

floods an island that floats – now, here’s a spoon, sit and eat,
begin at the shore.