stdClass Object
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    [ID] => 18970
    [post_author] => 23
    [post_date] => 2018-06-13 09:58:13
    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-13 09:58:13
    [post_content] => Kolo Touré is asked what he’d do if he were invisible for a day,
he says “I’d rob a bank and give the money to poorer people.”

There is so much we don’t understand about a man,
we see everything and nothing at the same time
like a page of writing written in a language we don’t read.

Jean-Michel Basquiat paints Self Portrait (Plaid) in 1983.
He colours himself featureless in all black,
cream slit eyes floating on the faceless.

Still
from the outline you know it’s him
you can tell,
maybe it’s the hair.

There is so much I don’t understand about a life,
I see everything and nothing at the same time
like a page of writing written in a language I don’t read.

When Basquiat paints himself a shadow
is he saying we’re all the same
or
is he trying (and failing) to give invisible?

Doesn’t he know that a faceless saviour can’t bring salvation?

Don’t they know this?

Doesn’t Touré know the question was a baseless dream?
    [post_title] => Give Invisible
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => give-invisible
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2018-06-13 10:06:08
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-13 10:06:08
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://poems.poetrysociety.org.uk/?post_type=poems&p=18970
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => poems
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            [wpcf-date-published] => 
            [wpcf-summary-description] => This poem was commissioned as part of the Thinking Outside the Penalty Box project celebrating African lives in football. It was included in the Young Poets Network challenge of the same name and inspired young poets to write in response. This poem, alongside three other commissioned poems, the challenge winning poems, and poems created in a workshop with Kayo Chingonyi at The Poetry Society, appear in the free Thinking Outside the Penalty Box anthology which you can read here.

To find out more about this poem and the project, visit the Thinking Outside the Penalty Box page.
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    [poet_data] => stdClass Object
        (
            [ID] => 18965
            [forename] => 
            [surname] => 
            [title] => Sugar J
            [slug] => sugar-j
            [content] => Sugar J’s poem ‘Give Invisible’ was commissioned as part of the Thinking Outside the Penalty Box project, in a partnership with The Poetry Society’s Young Poets Network on a challenge celebrating extraordinary lives of African footballers in 2018. His commissioned poem, three other commissioned poems, the winners of the challenge and poems created in a workshop led by Kayo Chingonyi at The Poetry Society appear in an anthology available to read on The Poetry Society’s website.
        )

)
stdClass Object
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    [ID] => 18965
    [forename] => 
    [surname] => 
    [title] => Sugar J
    [slug] => sugar-j
    [content] => Sugar J’s poem ‘Give Invisible’ was commissioned as part of the Thinking Outside the Penalty Box project, in a partnership with The Poetry Society’s Young Poets Network on a challenge celebrating extraordinary lives of African footballers in 2018. His commissioned poem, three other commissioned poems, the winners of the challenge and poems created in a workshop led by Kayo Chingonyi at The Poetry Society appear in an anthology available to read on The Poetry Society’s website.
)

Give Invisible

Sugar J

Kolo Touré is asked what he’d do if he were invisible for a day,
he says “I’d rob a bank and give the money to poorer people.”

There is so much we don’t understand about a man,
we see everything and nothing at the same time
like a page of writing written in a language we don’t read.

Jean-Michel Basquiat paints Self Portrait (Plaid) in 1983.
He colours himself featureless in all black,
cream slit eyes floating on the faceless.

Still
from the outline you know it’s him
you can tell,
maybe it’s the hair.

There is so much I don’t understand about a life,
I see everything and nothing at the same time
like a page of writing written in a language I don’t read.

When Basquiat paints himself a shadow
is he saying we’re all the same
or
is he trying (and failing) to give invisible?

Doesn’t he know that a faceless saviour can’t bring salvation?

Don’t they know this?

Doesn’t Touré know the question was a baseless dream?