stdClass Object
(
    [ID] => 5293
    [post_author] => 7
    [post_date] => 2015-02-23 15:15:34
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-23 15:15:34
    [post_content] => My love.
                I hope you have received the package –
A little snack, and that French language book.
You’ll guess I made those chocolate things myself:
I meant to make 16, not 12, but 4
Got snaggled into lumps of flour and butter –
And goodness knows your 12 are little better.

I look at the morning paper over breakfast.
Later I help Miss Dean to clean the church.
Sometimes, like fledglings on a perch, I pause,
And stop whatever I’m doing round the house;
And sometimes in the street I stand quite still
And hear the news boys cry the news they sell.

I write to you last thing when dusk is dim.
After I’ve unpinned and brushed my hair,
I take a sheet of paper from the drawer;
Smooth it flat across the desk; write your address –
With luck your section won’t have moved away –
And suck my pen and think of what to say.

Well, let me know if you get leave for New Year’s, And I’ll hang a light above the doorway.                                                                               Yours.

[post_title] => From Home [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => from-home [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-07-18 15:28:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-07-18 15:28:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://poetrysociety.org.uk.gridhosted.co.uk/?post_type=poems&p=5293 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => poems [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [meta_data] => stdClass Object ( [wpcf-published-in] => [wpcf-date-published] => 2014 [wpcf-summary-description] => Mary Anne says of her poem: “In ‘From Home’ I try to express the feelings of a wife whose husband is away at war without explaining them directly. Douglas used this style of detachment to convey how war dislocates people from their old selves, so they can no longer feel the way they used to. I want to show how war affects even those left behind: a wife wants to send her husband comfort from home, but she herself has lost all sense of comfort and all sense of home. The woman in the poem feels that her life has been suspended. She is constantly preoccupied by thoughts of the danger her husband is in. Her fear and love cannot be expressed in a letter, and so she suppresses them and is only able to discuss banalities. With the frequent use of half rhymes that do not quite satisfy, I aim to evoke the things that are almost said, but remain just below the surface. The woman wants to say more – she does not know whether she will ever see her husband again – but she cannot bear to, or perhaps has no experience of putting such feelings into words. Each verse jumps to a different topic, as if every possible subject for discussion contains dangers and must be changed. Towards the end she claims that, before writing each letter, she ‘think[s] of what to say’ – but then the poem comes to an abrupt conclusion and she has not really said anything. By avoiding overt emotion, Keith Douglas explored how hard it is for those at war to express what they are going through – they have experienced horrors that push the limits of the human imagination. I wanted to write about those back home, the ones who have experienced nothing and are left suspended, to wait and to imagine.” [wpcf-rights-information] => [wpcf-poem-award] => Runner-up, Timothy Corsellis Prize 2014 [wpcf_pr_belongs] => ) [poet_data] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 1764 [forename] => Mary Anne [surname] => Clarke [title] => Mary Anne Clarke [slug] => mary-anne-clarke [content] => Mary Anne Clarke often appears on the Poetry Society’s Young Poets’ Network, and has won their Cape Farewell and Edith Sitwell prizes. She has been commended for the Foyle Young Poets of the Year Award, Ledbury and Basil Bunting awards, and longlisted for the Christopher Tower Prize. Mary Anne was a Young Producer for both the Southbank Centre and the Poetry Society National Poetry Day Live 2014. Mary Ann Clark is a winner of Young Poets Network challenges including 'Imagism' and 'Winter poems'. ) )
stdClass Object
(
    [ID] => 1764
    [forename] => Mary Anne
    [surname] => Clarke
    [title] => Mary Anne Clarke
    [slug] => mary-anne-clarke
    [content] => Mary Anne Clarke often appears on the Poetry Society’s Young Poets’ Network, and has won their Cape Farewell and Edith Sitwell prizes. She has been commended for the Foyle Young Poets of the Year Award, Ledbury and Basil Bunting awards, and longlisted for the Christopher Tower Prize. Mary Anne was a Young Producer for both the Southbank Centre and the Poetry Society National Poetry Day Live 2014.

Mary Ann Clark is a winner of Young Poets Network challenges including 'Imagism' and 'Winter poems'.
)

From Home

Mary Anne Clarke

My love.
                I hope you have received the package –
A little snack, and that French language book.
You’ll guess I made those chocolate things myself:
I meant to make 16, not 12, but 4
Got snaggled into lumps of flour and butter –
And goodness knows your 12 are little better.

I look at the morning paper over breakfast.
Later I help Miss Dean to clean the church.
Sometimes, like fledglings on a perch, I pause,
And stop whatever I’m doing round the house;
And sometimes in the street I stand quite still
And hear the news boys cry the news they sell.

I write to you last thing when dusk is dim.
After I’ve unpinned and brushed my hair,
I take a sheet of paper from the drawer;
Smooth it flat across the desk; write your address –
With luck your section won’t have moved away –
And suck my pen and think of what to say.

Well, let me know if you get leave for New Year’s,
And I’ll hang a light above the doorway.
                                                                              Yours.