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    [ID] => 5289
    [post_author] => 7
    [post_date] => 2015-02-23 14:35:38
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-23 14:35:38
    [post_content] => 

I

What I admire is Dew
To have the strength of Dew
To pass apparitional through a place
Without trace or title
To be Snow!
To be almost actual!
Oh pristine example
Of claiming a place on the earth
Only to cancel
Rain
Rain
Smashed against stone
I love leaf and un-leaf
Of frost and un-fern
All these incisions
And indecisions of the Dawn
Yes Yes there is Ice but I notice
The Water doesn’t like it so orderly
What Water admires
Is the slapstick rush of things melting
I have taken my bedding to the fields
First it was Mist
Uncontrollably whispering
Then it was Dew
Disclosing the cold in my mind
Saying simply that it
Comes from nothing
And will return to nothing
Then it was…

II

In their lunch hour
I saw the shop-workers get into water
They put their watches on the stones and slithered
frightened
Into the tight-fitting river
And shook out cuffs of splash
And swam wide strokes towards the trees
And after a while swam back
With rigid cormorant smiles
Shocked I suppose from taking on
Something impossible to think through
Something old and obsessive like the centre of a rose
And for that reason they quickly turned
And struggled out again and retrieved their watches
Stooped on the grass-line hurrying now
They began to laugh and from their meaty backs
A million crackling things
Burst into flight which was either water
Or the hour itself ascending.

 

 

Find more information about National Poetry Day.
    [post_title] => Evaporations
    [post_excerpt] => 
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    [post_name] => evaporations
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    [post_modified] => 2017-01-05 10:39:50
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-05 10:39:50
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            [wpcf-published-in] => 
            [wpcf-date-published] => 2013
            [wpcf-summary-description] => Poet Alice Oswald and artist Chana Dubinski have collaborated to create a new filmpoem exploring water’s different states. The theme of National Poetry Day 2013 was ‘Water, Water Everywhere’. The Poetry Society commissioned this new work to celebrate.

Evaporations by Alice Oswald and Chana Dubinski received its first screening at National Poetry Day Live, Southbank Centre, London 3 October 2013.
A Poetry Society Production, 2013. Director of Photography Andrew Brown. Editor Richard Couzins. Filmed on location in Devon, with thanks to Riverford Organic Farms. [wpcf-rights-information] => [wpcf-poem-award] => New Commission plus Filmpoem [wpcf_pr_belongs] => ) [poet_data] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 1143 [forename] => Alice [surname] => Oswald [title] => Alice Oswald [slug] => alice-oswald [content] => Alice Oswald was the inaugural winner of the Ted Hughes Award for New Work in Poetry in 2009 for her collection Weeds and Wildflowers. She lives in Devon and is married with three children. Her book-length poem Dart, originally commissioned by The Poetry Society, won the T.S. Eliot Prize in 2002. Her third collection, Woods etc., won the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize 2006, and in 2009 she was awarded the Hawthornden Prize for A Sleepwalk on the Severn, a night-piece for several voices set on the Severn Estuary. Memorial (Faber, 2012) was the winner of The Poetry Society's Popescu Prize in 2013, and was also awarded the 2013 Warwick Prize for writing. Tithonus, featured on BBC Radio 4's The Echo Chamber, was shortlisted for the 2014 Ted Hughes Award. She has worked on several commissions for The Poetry Society, including for Painting Paradise and National Poetry Day. In 2017 her collection Falling Awake (Jonathan Cape, 2016) won the Costa Poetry Award. ) )
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    [ID] => 1143
    [forename] => Alice 
    [surname] => Oswald
    [title] => Alice Oswald
    [slug] => alice-oswald
    [content] => Alice Oswald was the inaugural winner of the Ted Hughes Award for New Work in Poetry in 2009 for her collection Weeds and Wildflowers. She lives in Devon and is married with three children. Her book-length poem Dart, originally commissioned by The Poetry Society, won the T.S. Eliot Prize in 2002. Her third collection, Woods etc., won the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize 2006, and in 2009 she was awarded the Hawthornden Prize for A Sleepwalk on the Severn, a night-piece for several voices set on the Severn Estuary. Memorial (Faber, 2012) was the winner of The Poetry Society's Popescu Prize in 2013, and was also awarded the 2013 Warwick Prize for writing. Tithonus, featured on BBC Radio 4's The Echo Chamber, was shortlisted for the 2014 Ted Hughes Award. She has worked on several commissions for The Poetry Society, including for Painting Paradise and National Poetry Day. In 2017 her collection Falling Awake (Jonathan Cape, 2016) won the Costa Poetry Award.
)

Evaporations

Alice Oswald

I

What I admire is Dew
To have the strength of Dew
To pass apparitional through a place
Without trace or title
To be Snow!
To be almost actual!
Oh pristine example
Of claiming a place on the earth
Only to cancel
Rain
Rain
Smashed against stone
I love leaf and un-leaf
Of frost and un-fern
All these incisions
And indecisions of the Dawn
Yes Yes there is Ice but I notice
The Water doesn’t like it so orderly
What Water admires
Is the slapstick rush of things melting
I have taken my bedding to the fields
First it was Mist
Uncontrollably whispering
Then it was Dew
Disclosing the cold in my mind
Saying simply that it
Comes from nothing
And will return to nothing
Then it was…

II

In their lunch hour
I saw the shop-workers get into water
They put their watches on the stones and slithered
frightened
Into the tight-fitting river
And shook out cuffs of splash
And swam wide strokes towards the trees
And after a while swam back
With rigid cormorant smiles
Shocked I suppose from taking on
Something impossible to think through
Something old and obsessive like the centre of a rose
And for that reason they quickly turned
And struggled out again and retrieved their watches
Stooped on the grass-line hurrying now
They began to laugh and from their meaty backs
A million crackling things
Burst into flight which was either water
Or the hour itself ascending.

 

 

Find more information about National Poetry Day.