stdClass Object
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    [ID] => 18299
    [post_author] => 23
    [post_date] => 2017-09-28 16:34:27
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-28 16:34:27
    [post_content] => We never reached higher than the lower branches
But I swear our bones were oak and our fingers brushed the sky.
We never worried about the wind tearing at our clothes like wild animals,
Climbing the hill where the grass reached our thighs.
One night we took a tent and pitched it up, huddling around the small fire,
Watching the embers danced, chasing the dandelion seeds
As we whistled with the whispering wind.
"Do you think we'll reach heaven?" she asked,
Drawing pictures with her finger,
A dot-to-dot among the stars we couldn't see
In streets illuminated by lampposts alone.
"Aren't we there already?" I replied. We didn't sleep,
Watching the world fade into darkness, guarded by the trees.
We saw the moon in the early morning,
Dawn taking her throne as the night turned to sleep.
We listened to the gentle rushing of the brook
And made the small jump before we climbed the lower branches again.
When it became too cold to camp,
We watched the milk-coloured flowers bloom,
Surrounded by snowflakes that I admired too little.
The blossoms blew away and we witnessed ducks
Emerging for Spring alongside protest signs,
Ragged, torn posters, chants and the mournful calls
Of birds who lost their small Edens
At the hands behind axes and chainsaws.
We continued in our adventure,
Trampling where no path was carved,
Finding places only strips of sky had seen
Before we climbed the lower branches again.
    [post_title] => Camping In The Edgelands With My Cousin
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
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    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => camping-in-the-edgelands-with-my-cousin
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-12-12 14:07:57
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-12 14:07:57
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://poems.poetrysociety.org.uk/?post_type=poems&p=18299
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => poems
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            [wpcf-published-in] => 
            [wpcf-date-published] => 2017
            [wpcf-summary-description] => This poem is the second-prize-winner in August challenge #1 on Young Poets Network (YPN) in 2017.

Judge Magnus Dixon commented, "I loved this poem because of the place it took me.  It was a vivid rendering of place but also of time— I was transported back to my childhood, aged seven to nine.  I was always in awe of my sister, who is such an expert tree climber, she (in this respect only) verges on the primate and the opening brought back memories of time playing and running in the dunes and the small coppices around our village.  That natural affinity we have with the grubby and dirt of the outside world as children is beautifully represented in the line; ‘ I swear our bones were oak and our fingers brushed the sky.’  I loved that the edgelands are a space to play even for the natural world, as they watch ‘the embers dance, chasing the dandelion seeds.’  This idea of a space for play recurs in the of the speakers cousin, ‘drawing pictures with her finger/ a dot to dot among stars’ we couldn’t see’ and childhood reappears in the blooming of ‘milk coloured flowers.’  I knew that this poem would become special to me on my first reading of it, and a month later, it remains a favourite and a beautifully written reminder of childhood’s adventures."
            [wpcf-rights-information] => 
            [wpcf-poem-award] => 2nd prize-winner, 2017 August challenge #1
            [wpcf_pr_belongs] => 
        )

    [poet_data] => stdClass Object
        (
            [ID] => 16726
            [forename] => 
            [surname] => 
            [title] => Amelia Doherty
            [slug] => amelia-doherty
            [content] => Amelia is a second-prize winner in the Young Poets Network 2017 August challenge #1, themed around edgelands, and a winner in the Great Fire poetry challenge. She is also a commended poet in the Greys Court Palimpsest Poetry Challenge, and the Riddle Me This Poetry Challenge.
        )

)
stdClass Object
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    [ID] => 16726
    [forename] => 
    [surname] => 
    [title] => Amelia Doherty
    [slug] => amelia-doherty
    [content] => Amelia is a second-prize winner in the Young Poets Network 2017 August challenge #1, themed around edgelands, and a winner in the Great Fire poetry challenge. She is also a commended poet in the Greys Court Palimpsest Poetry Challenge, and the Riddle Me This Poetry Challenge.
)

Camping In The Edgelands With My Cousin

Amelia Doherty

We never reached higher than the lower branches
But I swear our bones were oak and our fingers brushed the sky.
We never worried about the wind tearing at our clothes like wild animals,
Climbing the hill where the grass reached our thighs.
One night we took a tent and pitched it up, huddling around the small fire,
Watching the embers danced, chasing the dandelion seeds
As we whistled with the whispering wind.
“Do you think we’ll reach heaven?” she asked,
Drawing pictures with her finger,
A dot-to-dot among the stars we couldn’t see
In streets illuminated by lampposts alone.
“Aren’t we there already?” I replied. We didn’t sleep,
Watching the world fade into darkness, guarded by the trees.
We saw the moon in the early morning,
Dawn taking her throne as the night turned to sleep.
We listened to the gentle rushing of the brook
And made the small jump before we climbed the lower branches again.
When it became too cold to camp,
We watched the milk-coloured flowers bloom,
Surrounded by snowflakes that I admired too little.
The blossoms blew away and we witnessed ducks
Emerging for Spring alongside protest signs,
Ragged, torn posters, chants and the mournful calls
Of birds who lost their small Edens
At the hands behind axes and chainsaws.
We continued in our adventure,
Trampling where no path was carved,
Finding places only strips of sky had seen
Before we climbed the lower branches again.