stdClass Object
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    [ID] => 5294
    [post_author] => 7
    [post_date] => 2015-02-23 15:19:44
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-23 15:19:44
    [post_content] => Was this where the plane came down,
Its fire put out in unmarked earth?
Among the sparse crow-companied trees,
An unnamed lane by Solway Firth?
Those living bodies crowded round,
What brought them to this lifeless scene?
Just a small stone set in soil:
“Unknown soldier, aged nineteen”.
My bones were buried further off,
The body melted down for scrap,
And in nine weeks some new boy’s head
Wore the dirt-stained airman’s cap.
Yet still I see them plodding on,
This iron hunger of the mind.
So the ones who walk before,
As the ones who fell behind.
    [post_title] => An English Airman Recalls His Death
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => an-english-airman-recalls-his-death
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    [post_modified] => 2016-07-18 15:28:15
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-07-18 15:28:15
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    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://poetrysociety.org.uk.gridhosted.co.uk/?post_type=poems&p=5294
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => poems
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        (
            [wpcf-published-in] => 
            [wpcf-date-published] => 2014
            [wpcf-summary-description] => Phyllida says: “My poem was inspired by the life and writing of Timothy Corsellis, particularly the poem ‘Engine Failure’. I was interested in how he created a sense of distance from the action of the poem. I tried to create a similar feeling by writing from the perspective of an anonymous young pilot similar to Corsellis, looking back decades later on the place where he was killed. I also liked how he used sounds to create a specific and visceral atmosphere, and I wanted to use this to suggest the colour and drama of an idea in an objective way. The anonymous speaker was important to me because I wanted to make the point that it is the essential humanity of these young men which makes their deaths significant, not their individual talent. The title and structure of my poem were chosen as a tribute to one of my favourite poems, ‘An Irish Airman Foresees His Death’ by W.B. Yeats.”
            [wpcf-rights-information] => 
            [wpcf-poem-award] => Runner-up, Timothy Corsellis Prize 2014
            [wpcf_pr_belongs] => 
        )

    [poet_data] => stdClass Object
        (
            [ID] => 5295
            [forename] => 
            [surname] => 
            [title] => Phyllida Jacobs
            [slug] => phyllida-jacobs
            [content] => Phyllida Jacobs is a winner of the Young Poets Network 'Shakespeare's shoes' challenge and a runner up for the inaugural Timothy Corsellis prize.
        )

)
stdClass Object
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    [ID] => 5295
    [forename] => 
    [surname] => 
    [title] => Phyllida Jacobs
    [slug] => phyllida-jacobs
    [content] => Phyllida Jacobs is a winner of the Young Poets Network 'Shakespeare's shoes' challenge and a runner up for the inaugural Timothy Corsellis prize.
)

An English Airman Recalls His Death

Phyllida Jacobs

Was this where the plane came down,
Its fire put out in unmarked earth?
Among the sparse crow-companied trees,
An unnamed lane by Solway Firth?
Those living bodies crowded round,
What brought them to this lifeless scene?
Just a small stone set in soil:
“Unknown soldier, aged nineteen”.
My bones were buried further off,
The body melted down for scrap,
And in nine weeks some new boy’s head
Wore the dirt-stained airman’s cap.
Yet still I see them plodding on,
This iron hunger of the mind.
So the ones who walk before,
As the ones who fell behind.